Tarun Gupta

Email Optimization For Different Email Clients

Tarun Gupta October 17th, 2015 Email Marketing 1 comment.

Go back a few years back and you had a handful of desktop email clients to use for e-mail marketing campaigns. Now, in the changed scenario, your emails should look good in a variety of desktop clients. In addition to that, you can't skip mobile users as 53% of them use their mobile devices to read mails and respond. The catch is clear. You have to draft an email which is equally compatible with all these desktop clients (Gmail to Outlook to Yahoo! Mail) and mobile devices.


Worried? Need not to. There are ways to optimize emails for different desktop email clients. Before getting into them, see the top 10 email clients used by the marketers.

  • Apple iPhone's Mail app
  • Gmail
  • Apple iPad's Mail app
  • Google Android's Mail app
  • Outlook
  • Apple Mail desktop app
  • Outlook.com
  • Yahoo! Mail
  • Windows Live Mail
  • AOL Mail

Tips For Email Optimization For Different Email Clients

The names are ordered in their popularity. Here are some tips for optimizing your email for different email clients.

Give readers a link to an online version of your email

It might be possible that some email clients and mobile devices don't support HTML. While sending an email, keep a link of of the web version of that email included. In this way, the recipients who have an email client / device that doesn't support HTML can still see your email

Keep a plain text-version of your email

Email clients are choosy about the mail content and quickly kick it to spam folder if found it tricky. Mail to ensure delivery to a user's inbox, crate and optimize text-version of emails as well. Keep both multimedia and text-version of the email with you as most of the email providers support either version. You may seek help of email designing service professionals to get the best email designs that suit your campaign and has creative value.

  Important Elements Of A Great E-Mailer

Links must have an absolute path

Your mail is opened in n number of devices and environments, so it's important to keep your links absolute. If the recipient opens the mail outside your company network, the mail content may disappear due to broken links.

Images must carry an ALT text and absolute path

Like absolute paths are required for the internal links within the mail, the images too should carry absolute paths and an ALT text as well. If mails are accessed outside the environment, the absence of that absolute path may restrict opening of images. ALT text is important to identify that image within the email. Adding ALT text to your images helps recipients to know what the message is all about even if they can't see the images.

Images should be of a specific dimension

Setting specific width and height for the images helps to maintain the structure of email design. This is especially useful when images are turned off by email client. Resizing images to a defined dimension saves time since some email clients don't consider HTML size ratios.

Set up your mail preview text

Setting up email preview helps recipients having a brief intro of your email while hovering or clicking over the email. Some popular email clients display the first few lines of text from the body of your email alongside the subject line.

Test before sending the mail

Finally, it's time to shoot the mail. But before clicking the submit button, why don't give a full review of all that has been done so far. Double-check every step to find whether email looks fine or not. If your email client lets you preview mails in different clients, go ahead with. Be sure that you have already diagnosed the email list with an authentic email validation tools to weed out broken or invalid email ids. Send a test mail to sample email ids before you send out the real deal to ensure it's working properly.


  • Saurabh Panday

    Agree ! You should review and test emails before you send them to guarantee its working appropriately. Even if you think you’ve crossed your t’s and spotted your i’s, it’s still a smart thought to double-check whether your emails look on a par with you think they do.